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5 Reasons Why Your Dog is Sneezing Non-Stop

5 Reasons Why Your Dog is Sneezing Non-Stop

Witnessing your dog sneeze for the first time can be quite an adorable scene. You probably showered your sneezing puppies with cuddles and kisses, fawning over their cuteness.  

But if your dog persists to sneeze at just about every second, you start asking yourself, “Why is my dog sneezing non-stop?” 

What could it mean? And is it something to be concerned about? 

All these questions and more will be answered in this article, so do read on! 

 

Why is my dog sneezing non-stop?

Your dog sneezing non-stop may be due to something as harmless as him/her having fun, or it may be caused by a range of mild to serious medical reasons. A foreign object may be stuck on your dog’s nose causing irritation, or your dog may have allergies. More serious reasons could be infections or a sign of a nasal tumor.  

 

5 Reasons Why a Dog is Sneezing Non-Stop

 

1.Your dog is having fun

When your dog sneezes while playing, he/she is probably just having a great time. Excited dogs tend to express themselves using their whole body, and sneezing definitely counts! 

Your dog may also be sneezing as a form of communication. 

Sneezing can be interpreted as a signal that all the biting and roughhousing are just for plays. This allows their playmates to relax instead of putting their guards up and preparing for a fight. 

 

2.Something is stuck up your dog’s nose

If you know dogs at all, you’ll realize that they like to smell at pretty much everything. It is this same strong and reliable sense of smell that makes dogs beneficial in rescues and police operations. 

Dogs are also particularly fond of sticking their noses in things, places, and people that are unfamiliar to them.

For this reason, it’s very possible for dogs to get something stuck in their noses. 

If this is the reason why your dog can’t stop sneezing, you will also see them pawning at their noses, or you might notice blood, so it’s best to watch out for these signs. 

You should visit your vet to make sure everything is okay. If there really is something stuck in your dog’s nose, your vet can take it out and prescribe appropriate medications. 

 

3.Your dog has allergies

Turns out being man’s best friend also entails sharing medical issues. Yep, dogs are just as capable as humans are at acquiring allergies. 

If you’ve ever had allergies, you’re probably already are familiar with the symptoms that come with it.

Constant sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, itchy throat, swollen lips and eyelids are the most common symptoms.

It just so happens that your dog can also experience these symptoms if he/she has allergies.

Dog allergies may be caused by pollen, dust, food, flea bites, or simply something in the air that irritates their noses.

If you think allergies are the reason why your dog is sneezing non-stop, then talking to your vet would be advisable.

They can determine the specific allergen that caused your dog’s allergies, and from there, they can guide you on treatment and everything else your dog might need. 

 

4.Your dog caught an infection

Viruses and bacteria are present everywhere, making them infectious to both humans and animals. One, in particular, is the influenza virus. 

In dogs, this is appropriately termed as “canine influenza virus.” Symptoms include uncontrollable sneezing, loss of appetite, cough, sudden lethargy, fever, and discharge from your dog’s nose and eyes. 

Another canine infection that’s worth considering is the kennel cough. The Bordetella bronchiseptica, the bacteria that causes kennel cough.

It is contagious, so exercise caution in case this may be the reason for your dog’s constant sneezing. 

In terms of symptoms, the most evident would be distinct coughing that closely resembles that of a goose honk. In some cases, this can also be coupled with similar symptoms to canine influenza. 

In both cases, it is important to keep in mind that these infections are contagious, so remember to inform your vet before going in for a check-up. 

 

5.Your dog has a nasal tumor

A more serious reason for your dog’s incessant sneezing is having a nasal tumor. Exactly as it sounds, a nasal tumor is a tumor located on a dog’s nose. 

Although, statistically speaking, this is very unlikely as it reportedly only affects 1-2% of dogs. So, the chances of your dog having a tumor is slim. 

However, make sure to completely ruled out the possibility before moving on.

Aside from sneezing, a dog with a nasal tumor may also experience loss of appetite, bleeding, excessive amounts of nasal discharge, and heavy coughing. 

If your dog is showing these signs, be sure to contact your vet as soon as you can. 

 

Reverse Sneezing in Dogs

While sneezing is done by expelling out air, reverse sneezing is well… its reverse. Dogs pull in air instead of pushing them out. Why do dogs do this? 

Well, its exact cause is still unknown, but as logic suggests, it may be to get rid of irritants further down a dog’s trachea, right along its nasopharynx. 

Sneezing can only expel irritants along a dog’s nasal cavity, and coughing can only reach as far as a dog’s trachea.

Reverse sneezing helps dogs reach areas sneezing and coughing couldn’t.

 

Frequently Asked Questions About Dogs Sneezing Non-Stop

 

What can I do to help my dog stop sneezing?

You can apply saline nose drops to your dog’s nose as a way to clean it, or you can visually inspect your dog’s nose for foreign objects using a flashlight. You can also reduce your dog’s time for walks and outdoor activities in case sneezing is caused by environmental factors. Ultimately, it’s best to consult a vet. 

 

When should I take my sneezing dog to the vet?

You should take your dog to the vet when you think your dog is having trouble breathing, when you notice blood, or when the sneezing doesn’t relent despite having taken appropriate measures. However, regular visits to the vet are always best to ensure your dog is and stays healthy.


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