Skip to Content

How to Keep My Dog From Scratching the Door?

How to Keep My Dog From Scratching the Door?

While dogs tend to be silly creatures that do silly things, their behavior can be destructive. Like when they damage objects in your home, such as their favorite scratch post, aka your door.

And we take it that since you’ve clicked on this article that just like your dog, you’re scratching too.

But you’re scratching your head out of frustration for this behavior. Fret not; we’ve just the right thing for you!

 

How to keep my dog from scratching the door?

Door scratching in dogs is best dealt with by knowing the reason behind it first. Once you’ve pinpointed the cause, several management techniques are at your disposal. It mostly boils down to proper training and using door protectors. The former gives long-lasting results despite being tedious. While the latter offers an immediate solution.

 

Know the root cause of the behavior

The first thing you have to consider is understanding the cause of your dog’s behavior. Identifying the cause of it will guide you in selecting the best intervention.

The usual reasons are that they may be bored, experiencing distress, or just want to go outside.

 

How to address the behavior

Once you know the reason for the scratching, you can proceed with the intervention. There are different ways to deal with this. The section below provides an explanation of each in detail.

 

Avoid reinforcing it

Of course, the initial method for preventing the scratching behavior is by avoiding reinforcing it. If it is caused by separation anxiety, try to avoid affection when leaving.

Being too emotional in front of your pet will just make them miss you and experience anxiety when you leave. Instead, ignore them occasionally when you’re around.

By doing this, your dog will understand that you will not always be there to play with them.

Besides, your pet will get to learn other habits to keep busy. You may also want to leave them with something they can get occupied with, like a toy or puzzle food.

When you arrive, manage your and your dog’s excitement. Ignore them until they calm down.

Responding with equal enthusiasm as your dog shows may only worsen anxiety. Also, this will teach them that they should always be calm even when they’re away.

 

Training your dog

The best way to get rid of the destructive behavior is to train your pet. While this may take time, the results are often long-lasting.

Puppies are usually receptive to training methods. For older dogs, more persistence and patience are needed but they will respond to training eventually.

You may want to bring a lot of treats when you carry out your training. Because who doesn’t love treats? Give him/her treats when he/she stops the action. Belly rubs and scratches are also effective!!

When the dog starts scratching the door, assert your authority. Respond with a firm “No.” This makes them understand that their behavior is unacceptable.

They will eventually get the cue. Once the scratching stopped, don’t hold out on affection and treats.

 

Distraction is your best option

If the scratching is caused by boredom, distraction is your best option. Dogs are very active creatures that require a lot of energy-spending activities.

When your pet scratches the door, take them for a lengthy walk. This will drain the energy out of them. So, when they get home, they won’t feel like wreaking havoc on your doors.

If walks aren’t in your option, especially now with health protocols still in effect, get creative.

You can drain your pet’s energy by playing fetch with their favorite toys such as tennis balls or discs within your backyard or space.

 

Establish a routine

Prevent the scratching by anticipating your dog’s needs. Whenever you notice that your dog is itching to go out, open the door for them.

This way, they won’t have to scratch your door. Of course, observing your dog and anticipating what they need may be impossible to do all the time.

Because of this, you may want to train them and come up with a signal for when they want to go out, like pressing a bell. Or better yet, establish a schedule when your pet can roam outside.

 

Use a door guard

While the best way to remove the behavior is through training, this may not always be optimal for busy fur parents or if the behavior got ingrained for too long.

In these cases, a door guard is your friend. It won’t stop the behavior, but it will prevent your door from getting scratches and scars.

 

Use a pet door

Contrary to the common notion, pet doors aren’t only for small pets. It comes in various sizes to suit your dog’s needs. Installing a pet door is the solution for when your dog scratches your door because they want to go out.

Depending on the quality and material of the pet door, it can be installed in your doors, walls, and sliding glass doors.

This way, your pet can come and go without your help and keep your doors in their tiptop shape.

Just make sure to monitor your dog or that you’ve established rules about boundaries. Otherwise, your fur babies might wander around.

Also, watch out for other animals that might go into your house. The door may seem like a signal for raccoons and coyotes to enter.

Prevent this by using electronic pet doors that only allows entry to your dog.

 

Summary

There are several ways a dog can behave to get what they want—one of this by scratching the door. Once reinforced, they may think that this is acceptable behavior.

To prevent this, you have to determine the root cause. After this, you can correct the behavior with proper training.

If this sounds too much, you can also count on different items to prevent your dog from damaging your doors, like pet doors and door guards.

Or better yet, you can also seek the advice of a professional on how to deal with it.

that do silly things, their behavior can be destructive. Like when they damage objects in your home, such as their favorite scratch post, aka your door.

And we take it that since you’ve clicked on this article that just like your dog, you’re scratching too.

But you’re scratching your head out of frustration for this behavior. Fret not; we’ve just the right thing for you!

Read about how to get two dogs to get along next.

My Cat Does Not Meow
Previous
My Cat Does Not Meow - Why is that?
What do Horses Do for Fun
Next
What do Horses Do for Fun? Let's see!